Hall Runner Rugs - How do I choose?

Runner rugs are an entirely different type of rug that you may be used to - and are very rarely designed to be the centerpiece of a loungeroom floor, but moreso made to fit perfectly in a hallway.

The standard size for a runner rug is 80cm. Unfortunately there's no too much variation in the width, but they do come in different lengths such as 300x80cm, 400x80cm, and in some collections, 500x80cm.

Choosing a hallway runner rug is actually easier than a regular rug as the only things you need to take into consideration is really just the length, design and perhaps the material too.

 

Material

Hallways are what we'd call 'high traffic areas' as when hallways are used - there's a very set line and pattern in which you'll be using it. In a room, you'll be walking in different areas, locations and there's probably some bits of your room where you hardly step at all.

In a hall way, you'll of course be walking in the same general areas all the time and if you have a runner rug there too - you're going to be walking on this considerably more than a rectangular rug in a room. What can this mean? Mostly two things:

The durability of the rug should be reasonably strong as it could wear faster.
Most houses have hallways at the entrance and thus the rug is going to be one of the first things you walk on. This can increase the amount of outside dirt/dust that you bring inside and on to the rug.

With all of the above taken into consideration, material is quite an important factor.
We sell runner rugs in two main types of material. Heat Set Polypropylene and Jute - with a single collection at this time containing wool runner rugs.

Polypropylene is cheap, hard wearing and easy to clean. As an obvious choice, it's what the majority of our runner rugs are made from. Jute is another nice choice for runner rugs as they are also hard wearing and add an exciting and interesting texture to a hallway.

 

Runner Length

As mentioned, most runner rugs come in 300x80cm, 400x80cm, and 500x80cm sizing.

If you're thinking of buying a runner rug online, all you should do prior to purchase is a little measuring. Make sure there's enough space on either side. Don't place the rug too close to the door, and ensure that the door has room to open.

Many people prefer a wider hallway when placing a rug, else it can look a little cramped. If the hallway is narrow it may be better to opt for a more simple and subdued patterning and colour. Maybe even traditional?

Runner rug on wooden flooring


A great example above of the type of setting where traditional works, with hallway size, length, and surrounding decor taken into consideration. 

Which Design?

Design makes a rug, but it's also the hardest to write about as every space is different. What works in your hallway is subjective and personal. While we can't really choose a design for you, we can give you a few tips to help you along the way...

When looking at a design of a rug, try to visualize it in your hallway. How does it make you feel? If you can imagine a rug within your space and it makes you feel happy or excited, this may be the rug for you.

Which effect do you want to achieve? You probably have a fair idea already of what you're looking for in a rug. Some spaces beg for colour, some for detailed patterning.

runner rug with plant


You will find that interestingly enough, traditional rugs really do fit in well with a lot of hallway environments so be sure to check out ranges such as Jewel and Sydney as pictured below (Jewel). To view the entire runner rugs range at Cheapestrugsonline, Click Here!

four traditional rugs in a row

 

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